Thursday, June 9, 2022

A minor irritant. . .

So I got to the level of the stack and noticed the Concordia Journal (Winter 2022, yes, I know I am behind) and saw a very nice photo of a church on the cover.  I paged through the journal for a minute and then was about to set it down when I noticed a reference on the inside cover identifying the handsome church.  Turns out it was Westminster Presbyterian Church in Minneapolis, MN.  Apparently there are no good looking Lutheran buildings, and in particular LCMS church buildings, appropriate for the cover of the official journal of Concordia Seminary, the Log Cabin Seminary with all its Walther pedigree and all, of the LCMS.  

Now I will readily admit to using images here from a variety of sources but I am not the official voice of an official seminary of the LCMS.  Perhaps they were rushed for time or just liked how this admittedly good looking Presbyterian Church looked.  Or maybe they just wanted to show a little ecumenical grace.  Whatever.  For my money, they should have put an LCMS congregation or of the seminary on the cover of an LCMS theological journal.  I hear they have some nice buildings in St. Louis and a new stained glass window?  After all, we are promoting our church, are we not?  Or maybe there is a hidden message here.  Perhaps they are neither Lutheran nor theological?  I am sure that the good folks on the faculty and in the administration would insist that was not the case.  Oh, well..... Just another minor irritant...

1 comment:

Steve said...

Agreed. A healthy sense of self-identity is essential for the survival any denomination, or nation for that matter, and putting a Presbyterian church on the cover of a Lutheran theological journal sends the wrong message. In contrast, I really appreciated the Lutheran Witness including photos of the original fourteen congregations of the LCMS in its recent 175th LCMS anniversary issue. It was surprising to see that they were all still open, though the original town names have often since changed, and that St. Paul in Hamel was such a large and attractive LCMS church building. This contradicts the widespread notion that LCMS churches were historically too poor to erect fine churches. Regularly featuring images of LCMS churches such as these would go a long way in not only fostering greater Lutheran self-identity, but also inspiring other LCMS congregations to an awareness of the many benefits of good church architecture.